Vintage Kansas City .com

   
26th & Wyandotte Sts.,
KANSAS CITY, MO.

 

The Sanitarium.


Library and Dining Room

Hall on 2nd Floor

Reception Hall & Stairway

Parlor and Library
 

     When I first started "Dr. Coe's Sanitarium," Kansas City was a place of about 40,000 inhabitants.  The principal portion of its business district lay between the City Hall and what is now known as the Junction, and was confined to Main and Delaware Streets.  The motive power on the street railway leading up town from the Union Depot was the mule, and the service was primitive in its character.

     These conditions made it necessary for me to select a location as near the business section of the city as possible in order that it might be accessible to visiting patients.  I made such a selection, and later changed to other locations as the city grew in population and the Sanitarium grew in popularity and reputation.  Finally, however, the time came when the Sanitarium had attained such a measure of success that the selection of a permanent location became a necessity.  I examined many sites in different parts of the city and finally fixed on that at 26th and Wyandotte Streets, as by far the best within or near the city.  This site affords the very finest possible view of Kansas City.  From it, as far as the eye can reach to the north, northeast and northwest, the city is visible.  Directly north lies the business center, with its restless life and energy.  It is so near that one can plainly read the signs on the buildings; yet so far that the noise and turmoil do not reach the ear, neither does the ever present smoke and dust darken the view.  The spectator stands in quiet, clear atmosphere overlooking but not participating in the busy, bustling life.  A little to the west lies the beautiful Penn Valley Park, while to the south, stretching away to Westport, Hyde Park and Roanoke is the choicest residence section of the city.  The Westport, or Rockhill Electric line, the main north and south transit line of the city, is but three blocks away.

     The Sanitarium Building is a large and commodious one.  Architecturally, the interior construction is modern, special attention being paid to light and ventilation.  There are no dark rooms.  This abundance of light adds to the brightness and cheerfulness of the interior and is especially appreciated by the patients whose condition compels them to remain indoors.  Sanitary plumbing, and perfect drainage combined with the natural healthfulness of its location, make the building a model invalid's home.

     On the first floor are the library, parlor and sitting room, as well as the living rooms of myself and family.  The upper stories are devoted to the use of the patients.  One room is set apart for operating purposes.  Here is to be found every instrument, appliance and accessory, essential to successful surgery.  The rule of the institution, however, is to avoid a surgical operation whenever possible.

     Care is taken to provide patients with healthful, well-cooked and nourishing food, each patient having his or her own tray.  The kitchen is a model of neatness and the cooking is as good as the best to be had anywhere.  I take pride in the fact that the milk of the Sanitarium is supplied by a herd of throoughbred Short Horn cows owned by myself.  I know it to be rich, pure and wholesome.

     By residing in the building myself, I am able to give the patients my personal attention at any hour of the day or night that my services may be demanded. 

A Brief Personal History  ~  About the Sanitarium ~ DeformitiesNervousness ~ Tumors Removed ~ Women's Diseases ~ Expenses ~ How to Get Here

   
26th & Wyandotte Sts.,
KANSAS CITY, MO.

More Kansas City History

Vintage Kansas City.com

Contact: timetravel at vintagekansascity dot com

Google
 
Web vintagekansascity.com
 In Association with Amazon.com

In association with
KC Web Links.com ~ The Ultimate Kansas City Internet Directory